President-Elect Nominees

INSAR Board Elections 2018 - President-Elect (2 nominees)

Click the nominee's name or scroll down the page to view personal statement and bio for each candidate:

Joseph D. Buxbaum, PhD

Peter C. Mundy, PhD




Joseph D. Buxbaum, PhD

Personal Statement:

Over the past decade, INSAR has become the single most important global autism research organization. Its success has come from promoting an integrated approach to, and understanding of, ASD across multiple platforms, including the annual meeting and the journal, as well as efforts to develop the next generation of autism researchers. INSAR’s achievements in developing collaboration and fostering research in diagnostic, clinical, behavioral, service delivery and neuropsychological aspects of ASD have been particularly impressive. INSAR is now poised to match these important achievements by expanding and enhancing its focus on preclinical research as well as in clinical trials. My experience in both basic and clinical science, as well as my experience working with young investigators, family and advocacy groups, and large, global, collaborative teams, has made me particularly qualified for the challenges and opportunities ahead for INSAR. My long-term relationship with stakeholders including families and individuals with ASD will further ensure that INSAR remains an inclusive space where a wide array of opinions are shared and integrated. As INSAR President, I would draw on my experience in these multiple domains to build new opportunities for international collaboration, inclusion and scientific and clinical excellence across all aspects of ASD research and treatment. I believe my experience makes me well qualified to lead INSAR through this next important phase of its mission.

Bio sketch:

Joseph D. Buxbaum, PhD, is Deputy Chair and Professor of Psychiatry, and the Director of the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai. Dr. Buxbaum is a renowned molecular neuroscientist and geneticist whose research aims to understand the molecular and genetic basis of ASD and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, with the goal of understanding the biology of the disorder. He is a founder and communicating PI of the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC), currently analyzing whole exome sequencing from 50,000 individuals to identify ASD genes. In addition, his group has taken a genetics-first approach and has characterized more than a dozen rodent models for ASD and associated disorders and is studying dozens of human ASD stem cell lines and several high-risk ASD genes. Since becoming Director of the Seaver Center in 2009, Dr. Buxbaum integrated his preclinical team with the clinical group to promote the best outcomes for people with autism, while also fostering and developing the careers of young investigators. The Seaver Center sees children and adults across a range of levels of functioning, both for ongoing treatment and for clinical research, including clinical trials, neuroimaging, EEG, and genetic studies. The Seaver Center also studies both idiopathic ASD and ASD associated with monogenic disorders. The Center integrates studies across genetic, molecular, cellular, systems and behavioral levels, by focusing on specific monogenic disorders both preclinically and clinically. This has already led to two neurobiologically-driven clinical trials in ASD-associated genetic disorders. Dr. Buxbaum serves as co-editor-in-chief of Molecular Autism and is involved in multiple family advocacy groups, including serving on the scientific advisory boards of the Autism Science Foundation and the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Foundation. More broadly, he works very closely with families, individuals with ASD and other stakeholders in all phases of his work. Dr. Buxbaum received his BSc in Math and Biology from Touro College, and his MSc and PhD in Neurobiology from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience at the Rockefeller University. With over 300 publications and a lead role in multiple federal and foundation grants, Dr. Buxbaum was elected to the US National Academy of Medicine in 2015.

 

Peter C. Mundy, PhD

Personal Statement:

It would be an honor to serve INSAR as President. The breadth of my career, as well as training and research in developmental, clinical, cognitive, educational, and neuroscience disciplines, enables me to appreciate the many advances in our field since the 1980’s. As President, I would look forward to working to assure that the society continues and expands its fundamental role in promoting and advancing the types of multidisciplinary and international research and training that are essential to the growth of our science. I am enthusiastic about providing service to the society. In the past, I served as Vice President of INSAR in 2008 and I am currently an Associate Editor of Autism Research. Now, I am excited by the possibility of taking on the challenges of a new and different role. I have firm plans for a yearlong sabbatical in the 2019-2020 in the UC system, which will allow me to engage fully in the productive and hopefully creative discharge of the responsibilities of this leadership role within INSAR.

Bio sketch:

Dr. Peter Mundy is the Lisa Capps Professor of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Education at the MIND Institute, and UC Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean in the School of Education at UC Davis. Dr. Mundy’s research focusses on examining the developmental and bio-behavioral basis of the social symptoms of ASD. He began this work at the University of Miami in 1979 as a graduate student collaborator on the development of measures of joint attention in the Early Social Communication Scale (ESCS). Beginning as a post-doctoral fellow in 1981 he entered into a 10-year NIH supported collaboration with Marian Sigman and Connie Kasari to examine the role of joint attention in the atypical social and learning development of preschool children with ASD. That research contributed to significant advances in diagnostic assessment and effective preschool interventions for autism. Clinically at UCLA Dr. Mundy was also the director of psychology on psychiatric inpatient units for adolescents including children with ASD and comorbid psychopathologies. He was recruited back to the University of Miami in 1991 where he expanded his theoretical and empirical work on the social-neurocognitive, developmental, and learning processing involved in joint attention disturbance in ASD. The expansion of his work was supported by NIH grants for longitudinal studies of the development of joint attention, the study of neurophysiological correlates of joint attention, and the social and emotional development of adolescents with ASD. He also directed the Department of Psychology’s Child Clinical and Developmental Program, the department’s outpatient mental health training clinic, a CDC project that contributed to the development of Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) network, and he was the Founding Director of the University of Miami/Nova Southeastern Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (with Michael Alessandri). Dr. Mundy was recruited to UC Davis in 2008 where began new projects in education with NIH and IES grants on virtual reality applications in assessment and intervention for ASD, and longitudinal studies of learning disabilities in school-aged children with ASD. The latter led to his ongoing collaboration with education faculty (Emily Solari) on how reading intervention may be leveraged in schools to advance social-communication and social-cognitive development in verbal students with ASD.

 

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